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Category: Anxiety

10 Reasons to Get a Massage

10 Reasons to Get a Massage

Restaura Health specializes in therapeutic massage. We can customize a massage specifically to your needs based on consultation with you at the beginning of your appointment. Depending on what you need, a massage can help relieve pain, relax your muscles, improve your posture, or reduce your stress. Here are a few reasons you should consider getting a message according to Harris School of Business article published in 2015:

1. Relieve stress and anxiety
In today’s modern world, there seem to be more stressors than ever before. Taking time out from your busy schedule to come into your favorite spa, or to simply sign up for a chair massage at the mall can help to reduce the amount of stress you are feeling.
2. Relieve lower back pain
When severe enough, this kind of pain can lead to missed work or disability. Massage therapy can be effective in decreasing pain in your lower back, and in decreasing the disability associated with it.
3. Reduce pain in other areas of the body
Common areas where clients seek relief from pain are the neck, the shoulders, knee and hip joints, and other areas of the body. There are many causes for pain, and massage therapists are trained to help clients with pain caused by a range of conditions including arthritis, cancer, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, myalgia, carpel tunnel syndrome, headache, trauma, and injury.
4. Reduce muscle tension
Massage, particularly a special sports massage, can help with conditioning, range of motion, and flexibility, as well as speed up recovery from muscle injuries.
5. Improve flexibility
Massage helps to stimulate blood circulation around your muscles, which increases the flow of oxygen and nutrients to your muscles, leading to increased flexibility, among other benefits.
To view more benefits from massage therapy such as boosting immunity, relieving tension headaches, increase overall wellbeing, etc feel free to visit >>https://www.harrisschool.edu/10-reasons-to-get-a-massage/

You should let your therapist know if you have specific areas of pain or where you’d like additional time spent during your massage. If you prefer a more general and relaxing massage we can also customize it in that way. All of our therapists have advanced training and will use your feedback to make your massage exactly what you need.

Simple Techniques To Help Stop An Anxiety Attack

Panic attacks can be sudden and overpowering. They can affect anyone and may be caused by general anxiety, panic disorder, or depression.

Physical and emotional symptoms can occur during an attack, often at the same time. Physical symptoms include sweating, rapid breathing, nausea, and a racing heartbeat. Emotional symptoms include feelings of fear and intense, repetitive worrying.

In this article, we look at ways to stop panic attacks and reduce the risk of their occurrence. We also look at how to help someone having an attack and describe the outlook for the future.

Ways to stop a panic attack

Accepting and recognizing panic attacks is an important part of reducing their impact.

Below are 13 methods that can help to alleviate the symptoms of a panic attack.

1. Acceptance and recognition

A person may have experienced panic attacks in the past. During an attack, it can help to remember that they pass and cause no physical harm, though they are unpleasant. A person should acknowledge that the attack is a brief period of concentrated anxiety and that it will end.

If a person is experiencing an attack for the first time, it is advisable to visit a doctor as soon as possible. Some symptoms of panic attacks can indicate other events, such as heart attacks or strokes.

2. Deep breathing

Deep breathing can sometimes bring a panic attack under control. Rapid breathing can increase anxiety and tension, so instead of taking long, slow breaths can help.

A person should breathe steadily, counting slowly to four while breathing in and to four when breathing out.

A feeling of tightness in the chest can cause a person to take short breaths during an attack. It is a good idea to breathe deeply from the abdomen, filling the lungs slowly and steadily.

3. Inhale lavender

Lavender essences have long been used to relieve anxiety and bring about a sense of calm relaxation. Inhaling the scent of lavender oil during a panic attack may help relieve some symptoms. A person can rub a small amount of oil onto their wrist or hand and inhale.

This oil is widely available online. Purchase it only from trusted retailers.

An individual should avoid lavender if they have recently taken a benzodiazepine medication. The two together can cause heightened drowsiness.

4. Limit stimuli

Sights and sounds can often intensify a panic attack. If possible, find a more peaceful spot. This could mean leaving a busy room or moving to lean against a nearby wall.

Closing the eyes can make it easier to focus on breathing and other coping strategies.

5. Learn triggers

A person’s panic attacks may often be triggered by the same things, such as enclosed spaces, crowds, or problems with money. By learning to manage or avoid triggers, a person may be able to reduce the frequency and intensity of attacks.

6. Light exercise

Light exercise can help to stop panic attacks. Exercise releases hormones called endorphins that relax the body and improve the mood.

Walking can help to produce endorphins, and it can also remove a person from a stressful environment. The rhythm of walking may also help a person to regulate their breathing.

7. Mindfulness exercises

Panic attacks can make people feel detached from reality. The intensity of anxiety can overtake other senses. Mindfulness can help to re-ground a person and direct their focus away from sources of stress.

Below is one example of a mindfulness exercise. Each step should be completed slowly and thoroughly:

  • Look at five separate things, thinking about each for some time.
  • Listen for four distinct sounds, and examine what is different about each one.
  • Touch three objects. Consider the texture, temperature, and uses.
  • Identify two different smells. Do they trigger any memories?
  • Taste something. This could be a fingertip or a piece of candy.

8. Focus on an object

Concentrating on a nearby object can help a person stop a panic attack. A person who experiences attacks regularly may want to carry something for this purpose.

Focusing on one thing can reduce other stimuli. As a person looks at the item, they may want to think about how it feels, who made it and what shape it is. This can help to reduce the symptoms of a panic attack.

9. Try muscle relaxation techniques

Another symptom of a panic attack is muscle tension. Practicing muscle relaxation techniques may help to limit an attack. If the mind senses that the body is relaxing, other symptoms, such as rapid breathing, may also diminish.

Progressive muscle relaxation is a popular technique for coping with anxiety and panic attacks.

10. Picture a happy place

A person’s happy place should be somewhere they would feel the most relaxed. Every aspect of it should be pleasing.

When a panic attack begins, it can help to close the eyes and imagine being in such a place. Think of how calm it is there. Imagine bare feet touching the cool soil, hot sand, or soft rugs.

Thinking about a relaxing and calm environment can help a person to become relaxed and calm.

11. Repeat a mantra

A mantra is a word, phrase, or sound that helps with focus and provides strength. Internally repeating a mantra can help a person to come out of a panic attack.

The mantra can take the form of reassurance and may be as simple as, “This too shall pass.” Or, it may have a more spiritual meaning.

As a person focuses on gently repeating a mantra, their physical responses can slow, allowing them to regulate their breathing and relax muscles.

12. Tell people

If panic attacks frequently occur in the same environment, such as a workplace, it may be helpful to inform others and let them know what kind of support to offer.

If an attack happens in public, telling even one person can help. They may be able to locate a quiet spot and prevent others from crowding in.

Article from: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321510.php

Simple Techniques To Help Stop An Anxiety Attack
Help relieve headaches & anxiety with lavender lemonade

Help relieve headaches & anxiety with lavender lemonade

Anxiety is the third most common mental health issue worldwide, and everyone suffers from a headache once in a while.  Doctors can prescribe medications to help us fight back, and while it can be useful for some extreme cases, not everyone is going to benefit from medications.

There are natural ways to combat anxiety and headaches. The most delicious way is easily this lavender lemonade.

Lavender Oil

Flavoring your lemonade with lavender is a great way to utilize the amazing medicinal properties of lavender. Lavender is a wonderfully aromatic herb that calms the senses.

You can choose to use the oil of lavender or the flower whichever you feel is more suitable for your health and well-being.

Pure lavender oil is an incredible essential oil to use for your own health and wellness. It’s among the gentlest of essential oils, but also one of the most powerful, making it a favorite of households for the healing properties and uses of lavender essential oil.

Benefits of Lavender Oil

Lavender oil has a chemically complex structure with over 150 active constituents, which explains its effectiveness at helping with a lot of health ailments. Lavender oil possesses amazing anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antidepressant, antiseptic, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, analgesic, detoxifier, hypotensive, and sedative properties.

Lavender oil possesses amazing properties:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-fungal
  • Antidepressant
  • Antiseptic
  • Antibacterial
  • Antimicrobial
  • Antispasmodic
  • Analgesic
  • Detoxifier
  • Hypotensive
  • Sedative properties

Florida researchers have found that lavender oil benefits include reducing anxiety and lowering pulse rates in nursing students taking stressful tests. And in hospital settings, lavender aromatherapy has been demonstrated to decrease pre-surgery distress and to be more relaxing than massage or merely resting.

The lavender essential oil has medicinal properties as well. It has been shown to reduce depression, improve insomnia and ease labor pains. And anecdotal evidence suggests that lavender oil benefits those with headaches, hangovers, sinus congestion, and pain relief.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup raw honey
  • 5 cups pure water
  • 1/4 cup dried lavender. dried, organic culinary lavender
  • 6 lemons, peeled and juiced approx.
  • Lavender sprigs for garnish

Directions

  1. Pour 1/2 the water in a pan, bring to boil and remove from heat
  2. Add honey and dried lavender let steep for approximately 20 minutes.
  3. Strain mixture and pour into larger container.
  4. Add lemon juice and the remaining water.  Stir well.
  5. Refrigerate.

Other Ways You Can Use Lavender for Anxiety and Headaches

  • Mix 5 to 6 drops of Lavender essential oil to your bath water if you have dry skin.
  • Diffuse 10 to 12 drops of Lavender into the air during your workday for natural stress relief.
  • Add 2 drops of Lavender per ounce of your favorite lightly scented, unrefined organic oil (like almond oil or olive oil) for a body oil with all the benefits of lavender for improving your skin, relaxing your mind, warding off insects or helping you sleep.

Article from: https://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/lavender-lemonade-recipe-headaches-anxiety/?fbclid=IwAR3FeD0gOx8jI_s8EBIXByKPFOlyH-QytqcDGPePZL3JbOAnqA92ScYqodo

Original photo credit: https://www.allfoodsrecipes.com/lavender-lemonade/

Natural Solutions for The Double Burden of Depression & Anxiety

As if depression or anxiety is not enough to deal with, many people have to deal with both. Alarmingly, about 85% of people with depression also experience some anxiety; about 90% of people with anxiety suffer some depression (Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2016;266(8):725–736). When people suffer from depression and anxiety simultaneously, the condition is more disabling and harder to treat

There is also a condition called Mixed Anxiety and Depressive Disorder (MADD), in which neither one predominates or is severe enough to warrant a psychiatric diagnosis separately, but, combined, do warrant a diagnosis.

Several natural supplements are effective for treating both depression and anxiety. Knowing about these treatments can be important from a perspective both of cost and of effectiveness.

Saffron

An important emerging herb for the treatment of depression is saffron. When people with depression were given 30mg of saffron extract or 100mg of the drug imipramine, the improvement was equal in the two groups, but the saffron was better because it was safer (BMC Complement Altern Med 2004;4:12). When 15mg of saffron petal extract or 10mg of Prozac are taken twice a day by people with depression, saffron brings about a significant effect that is equal to the effect of Prozac (JEthnopharmacol 2005;97:281-284; Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2007;31:439-442). Meta-analyses of saffron and depression have found the herb to be better than placebo and at least as good as drugs with the advantage of being safer (J Integr Med 2013;11:377-383; Hum Psychopharmacol 2014;29:517-527).

Excitingly, a recent study has shown for the first time that saffron is also an effective treatment for anxiety in people with depression and anxiety. This double-blind study gave 54 people with both mild to moderate depression and anxiety, according to the Beck Inventory, either a placebo or 100mg of saffron a day for twelve weeks. The saffron group had significantly greater improvement in depression than the placebo group with a 2 point greater improvement. The significant improvement in depression is consistent with the earlier saffron studies. What is new and exciting about this study is that the saffron group also had a significantly greater improvement in anxiety: the improvement was 3 points better than the placebo group (J Complement Integr Med 2016;13(2):195-199).

The evidence continues to mount for this impressive herb. When sixty people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety were given the SSRI citalopram or 30mg of saffron for six weeks, the response to both treatments for depression and anxiety was significant and equal, meaning that saffron was as good as the drug (Pharmacopsychiatry 2017;50(04):152-60).

And now, in a just-published study that seems to be the first study of kids with MADD, 68 kids between the ages of 12 and 16 were given either a placebo or 14mg of standardized saffron extract twice a day for eight weeks. All of the kids suffered from mild to moderate depression and anxiety. They were then evaluated for separation anxiety, social phobia, generalized anxiety, panic, obsessions/compulsions, and depression. The saffron produced significantly better improvements in overall symptoms and separately on separation anxiety, social phobia, and depression. Overall, the saffron group had a 33% reduction in their symptoms compared to a reduction of only 17% in the placebo group. Anyone who had a greater than 50% improvement in total score was considered to be a responder. While only 11% of the placebo group were responders, 37% of the saffron group were (J Affect Disord 2018;232:349-357).

Lavender

This gentle herb is as powerful as the not so gentle anti-anxiety drugs. Lavender oil capsules were compared to the benzodiazepine lorazepam in a six-week study of people with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). The results were the same for both treatments: lavender produced a 45% improvement on the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) and lorazepam produced a 46% improvement. Unlike benzodiazepines, though, the lavender oil was safe, non-sedating and non-addictive (Phytomed 2010;17(2):94-9).

Lavender can also compete with antidepressant drugs. People suffering from depression were given 60 drops of lavender tincture and placebo or 100mg of the antidepressant drug imipramine and placebo or 60 drops of lavender and 100mg of imipramine in a double-blind study. After 4 weeks, all 3 groups improved significantly. The group taking both imipramine and lavender experienced a significantly greater improvement than those taking either treatment alone (Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2003;27(1):123-7).

But what if you suffer from both anxiety and depression? When people with MADD were given 80mg of lavender oil or placebo for seventy days in a double-blind study, scores on the HAMA dropped significantly more in the lavender group: 10.8 points versus 8.4. Depression scores also dropped significantly more in the lavender group: 9.2 points versus 6.1. People on lavender had better clinical outcomes and better improvement in the quality of life (Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 2016;26:331–40).

Adding to the evidence is a study that compared 160mg of lavender oil a day to the SSRI paroxetine in people with GAD. After 10 weeks, HAMA scores decreased by 14.1 points on lavender but only by 11.3 points on paroxetine. 60.3% of people on lavender oil reduced their HAMA score by at least 50% compared to 43.2% on paroxetine. 46.3% of the lavender oil group now had scores below 10 versus only 34.1% of the paroxetine group. Interestingly for our topic, the lavender oil also showed “a pronounced antidepressant effect.” The researchers concluded that, for GAD, lavender oil is better and safer than paroxetine (Int J Neuropsychopharmacol 2014;17(6):859-869).

And one more intriguing thing about lavender, depression, and anxiety. Anxiety, stress, and depression during pregnancy can have a negative effect on the health of both the mother and child. So, in a double-blind study, researchers asked 141 healthy pregnant women to rub either a placebo cream or lavender cream onto their legs for ten to twenty minutes 1.5 hours before going to bed. The lavender cream contained 1.25% lavender essential oil. At the end of the eight-week study, there was a significant improvement in anxiety, stress, and depression in the lavender group compared to the placebo group. By the end of only the fourth week, there was already a significant improvement in stress and anxiety (J Caring Sci 2015;4:63-73).

St. John’s Wort

St. John’s wort is well known as a herb for depression. Less well known is that one double-blind study has also demonstrated that St. John’s wort reduces anxiety (Fortschr Med 1995;113:404-8).

5-HTP

In an impressive study, 43% of people who had not responded to any antidepressant drug responded to 5-HTP. An additional 8% improved significantly (Neuropsychobiol1980;6:230-40). A review of studies determined that 5-HTP is as effective as tricyclic antidepressant drugs (Biol Psychiatry 1981;16:291-310). 5-HTP beat an SSRI, the leading class of antidepressant drug: 60.7% responded to the 5-HTP versus 56.1% to the drug. 5-HTP brought about a greater response, and it did it faster and safer (Psychopathology 1991;24:53–81). And in a double-blind study, 5-HTP was the equal of Prozac (Asian J Psychiatr 2013;6:29-34).

But a placebo-controlled study has now also shown that 200mg of 5-HTP significantly reduces the reaction to a panic challenge in people with panic disorders. There was an improvement in anxiety, panic symptom score and the number of panic attacks (Psychiatry Res 2002;113:237-43).

Rhodiola

Rhodiola has the impressive ability to calm you down and energize you at the same time. Rhodiola calms stress, improves well-being and decreases mental and physical fatigue. When 80 people with mild anxiety were given either 200mg of Rhodiola Rosea or nothing twice a day for two weeks, compared to the control group, the Rhodiola group experienced significant reductions in anxiety, stress, anger, depression, and confusion. They also had significant improvement in overall mood (Phytother Res 2015; 29(12):1934-9). So, Rhodiola also helps both anxiety and depression.

Probiotics

A strange addition to the list is probiotics: not usually thought of as a psychological supplement. In the first-ever study of probiotics and psychological conditions, people with depression had significantly better improvement in mood on a probiotic than on a placebo (Eur J Clin Nutr 2007;61:355-61). That study introduced probiotics as a supplement for depression. A second study found that a month of probiotics significantly improved depression and anger (Gut Microbes 2011;2:256-61). But, the same study also found significant improvement in anxiety. An earlier study had already hinted at an antianxiety effect for probiotics: a placebo-controlled study of people with chronic fatigue syndrome found that probiotics significantly reduced their anxiety scores (Gut Pathology 2009;1:6-10). So, the research also points to probiotics as a supplement for people with both depression and anxiety.

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Photo credit: https://bohohobbit.com/2017/02/12/taking-that-other-path-in-the-fork-of-the-road/o-woman-looking-out-window-facebook/

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.
Natural Solutions for The Double Burden of Depression & Anxiety