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Category: Arthritis

Importance of fitness after turning 40

Importance of fitness after turning 40

In your 40s and beyond, fitness tends to take on a new shape. Exercise routines you once found merely challenging may become painful or even impossible by the time you’re 40, 50, or 60. Many people first feel the effects of age in their joints.
As we age, our connective tissue (the supportive framework for the body, like cartilage, tendons, and ligaments) becomes less elastic, says William J. Evans, PhD, director of the nutrition, metabolism, and exercise laboratory at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences’ Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging. That leads to a greater risk of injury to the joints. And that’s why, if you took step aerobics class or ran five miles a day in your 20s and 30s, you may have switched to cycling, swimming, or walking in your 40s or beyond.
Those higher-impact exercises just don’t feel as good as they once did. In fact, the aging of the baby boomer generation is one reason low-impact fitness choices like elliptical trainers, recumbent bikes, yoga, and Pilates have become so popular.
But softening the impact is not the only way we should change our routines as we age, it’s also more important than ever to do strength training.
Studies have also shown that resistance training helps with joint elasticity, flexibility, and bone density. Whether you’re 45 or 70, it’s never too late to start (or restart) an exercise program, experts say. A person who is fit is capable of living life to its fullest extent. Physical and mental fitness play very important roles in your lives and people who are both, physically and mentally fit are less prone to medical conditions as well. People who are physically fit are also healthier, are able to maintain their most optimum weight, and are also not prone to cardiac and other health problems. In order to maintain a relaxed state of mind, a person should be physically active. A person who is fit both physically and mentally is strong enough to face the ups and downs of life, and is not affected by drastic changes if they take place. If you are interested in fitness over 40, you should check out our 40 Plus Fitness program. Here at Restaura Health we can help you with group fitness or you can even have one on one sessions with our trainers to meet your individual needs. Call any time if you want more information.

 

Here are seven ways that just a spoonful of turmeric a day can prove to be your secret miracle spice

1. Battling inflammation naturally: As you may know, chronic inflammation is believed to be at the root of many modern illnesses. Turmeric’s active ingredient, curcumin, has been found by researchers to be a very effective and potent anti-inflammatory, even exceeding the performance of drugs intended to fight inflammation.

2. Brain protection: Turmeric can protect against the development of cognitive disorders like dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, two conditions often associated with Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, or BDNF, a type of growth hormone. Scientists have discovered that curcumin positively affects the BDNF levels in the brain, and may delay or even reverse a number of brain diseases or age-related degenerative conditions.

3. Risk reduced for several types of cancer:

In reality, turmeric could very well be one of the most potent natural anti-cancer agents there is. Not only can it prevent the growth of cancer cells, but it also blocks the development and spread of cancer and, some believe, may even hold the cure for several cancers.

4. Improve your digestion: Daily consumption of turmeric can reduce gas and bloating, stimulate the gallbladder and prevent inflammation of the digestive tract. That said, turmeric should not be taken on a daily basis by people suffering from gallbladder disease, as the over-stimulating properties of turmeric can worsen that condition.

5. Heart health: Curcumin can reduce LDL – or bad cholesterol – which will then prevent blood clotting while removing arterial plaque buildup.

6. Eases arthritis: Scientists admit that more research is needed in this particular use of turmeric, however, that said, many people have reported various levels of improvement in this condition when they consume a teaspoon of the queen of spices per day. The theory is that the curcumin in turmeric helps battle chronic inflammation and thereby reduces the pain associated therewith. Some even say that curcumin supplements work much better than over-the-counter or prescription medications aimed at reducing inflammation – and all without any side-effects.

7. Delays aging and increases longevity: Being able to live longer and stay healthier seems to be on everyone’s mind these days. One of the secrets to achieving this may lie in magical turmeric. Free radicals and inflammation are both believed to cause premature aging, and curcumin has proven in many cases to reverse those conditions.

Article from: https://www.resperate.com/blog/hypertension/diet/healthy-foods/heres-what-gets-activated-in-your-body-when-you-eat-just-one-teaspoon-of-turmeric-every-day

Original photo credit: https://www.swansonvitamins.com/blog/lindsey/what-is-turmeric

Here are seven ways that just a spoonful of turmeric a day can prove to be your secret miracle spice
9 Herbs to Fight Arthritis Pain

9 Herbs to Fight Arthritis Pain

Arthritis symptoms can keep you from going about your everyday activities. The pain and inflammation may still persist despite medical intervention. To get relief, more and more people with arthritis are seeking a natural approach by using herbal remedies.

Certain herbs may have anti-inflammatory properties that can help with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by reducing pain in all forms of the disease. Still, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting such claims. Before you treat arthritis the “natural” way, make sure you talk to a doctor first to avoid life-threatening side effects.

1. Aloe vera

“aloe-vera”

Aloe vera is one of the most commonly used herbs in alternative medicine. Known for its healing properties, it’s popular for treating small skin abrasions. You may already have a bottle of aloe vera gel in the medicine cabinet from a past sunburn. This same type of product may be applied topically to soothe aching joints.

Aloe vera is also available in the whole form from the leaves of the plant. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) says that oral aloe vera can cause decreased blood sugar and gastrointestinal side effects, such as diarrhea. Topical aloe vera, on the other hand, does not cause any side effects and should be safe to try for arthritis.

2. Boswellia

“boswellia”

Boswellia, also called frankincense, is praised by alternative medicine practitioners for its anti-inflammatory capabilities. It’s derived from the gum of Boswellia trees indigenous to India.

This herb is thought to work by blocking substances (leukotrienes) that attack healthy joints in autoimmune diseases such as RA. The NCCIH acknowledges promising evidence of Boswellia in animal studies. But it notes a lack of human trials. Boswellia is available in tablet form and topical creams.

3. Cat’s claw

“Cats Claw”

Cat’s claw is another anti-inflammatory herb that may reduce swelling in arthritis. This herb is from a tropical vine, and its usage dates back to Incan civilizations. Traditionally, cat’s claw is used to boost the immune system.

In recent years, the immunity powers of the herb have been tried in arthritis. The downside is that cat’s claw may overstimulate the immune system and make arthritis pain worse.

According to the Arthritis Foundation, a study showed cat’s claw can help with RA swelling. But there’s no proof that this herb can prevent further joint damage.

4. Eucalyptus

“eucalyptus”

Like aloe vera, eucalyptus is widely available in Western markets. It’s used in oral medications, and topical oil extracts are used for a variety of conditions. Topical forms of eucalyptus leaves are used to treat arthritis pain.

The plant leaves contain tannins, which may be helpful in reducing swelling and the pain arthritis causes. Some users follow up with heat pads to maximize the effects of eucalyptus on swollen joints.

Be sure to test yourself for allergies before using topical eucalyptus. Put a small amount of the product on your forearm. If there is no reaction in 24 to 48 hours, it should be safe to use.

5. Ginger

“ginger”

You may have ginger in your spice cabinet for cooking, but this herb is also a staple in many alternative medicine cabinets. The same compounds that give ginger its strong flavor also have anti-inflammatory properties.

The NCCIH says that early studies in reducing joint swelling with ginger in RA are promising. But more human trials are needed to better understand its action. In folk medicine and Chinese medicine, ginger is used to increase blood circulation, which brings heat and healing properties to the affected area. Research shows promise for the use of ginger in all types of arthritis.

6. Green tea

“green-tea”

Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world, and has been used to reduce inflammation in the body. It’s possible that green tea can be used to treat arthritis inflammation in the form of beverages, tablets, or tinctures.

In a 2010 study, the NCCIH found that green tea might help people with osteoarthritis (OA) and RA. But many more studies are still needed to prove the potential benefits of green tea.

7. Thunder god vine

“thunder-god-vine”

Thunder god vine is one of the oldest herbs used in Chinese medicine. Extracts from skinned roots are known for suppressing an overactive immune system. This makes thunder god vine a possible alternative treatment for autoimmune diseases such as RA. It’s best to apply directly to the skin in a topical form. Thunder god vine may work best along with conventional RA medications.

Use extreme caution with this herb, as it can be poisonous if extracts are derived from other areas of the vine. Long-term use is not recommended.

8. Turmeric

“turmeric”

Turmeric is a yellow powder made from the related flowering plant. It’s used in cooking to make curry. It also has anti-inflammatory properties.

Lab studies on rats have also found this herb may slow the progression of RA. Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, has been used in folk medicine for years. Unlike other types of herbs, the NCCIH found turmeric may work best in fighting joint pain when taken orally.

There still needs to be more studies done on the safety of turmeric, but its use is promising.

9. Willow Bark

“willow-bark”

Using willow bark is one of the oldest treatments for inflammation. In fact, people during Hippocrates’ time (fifth century B.C.) chewed on willow bark to help treat inflammatory conditions.

One study reported that the herb shows promise in relieving OA-related joint pain, particularly in the knees, back, hips, and neck. This treatment is taken orally, either by tea or tablet.

Getting the right dose is crucial. An overdose can cause rashes and other forms of inflammation. Do not use willow bark if you take blood thinners or are allergic to aspirin.

Article from: https://www.healthline.com/health/osteoarthritis/herbs-arthritis-pain